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's been lacking. it's embarrassing to me for the nearly years i have been a member of the united states national not to see that leadership exhibited in the united states of america. thank you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, this week my home state of mississippi received the sobering news that our economy had slipped back into recession. frankly, i'm concerned that my state may be a harbinger for the rest of the country. despite national efforts to create new jobs and opportunities, our economy is not getting significantly bett better. it is a problem, we think. in most states unemployment has remained over 8% for more than three years despite spending nearly $1 trillion with the president's 2009 stimulus package. investments in small business growth have languished, and they've done this in a state of the economy, tax policy, federal regulations that seem to have made matters worse. the course we're on is simply not good enough. we hope and we urge the senate to make a strong stand. let's get to
to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 20, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i would yield to my friend from delaware and ask that i be recognized when he finishes his remarks. the presiding officer: the senator from delaware. mr. coons: thank you very much, mr. president. i rise today to express my gratitude to leader reid, to chaplain black, to all of us in the chamber and my gratitude to the reverent dr. dug gerdts. it is my honor and privilege to welcome him to our chamber this morning as one of delaware's finest leaders. reverend gerdts leads the congregation at first and centr
think for example that some day that the world will go to mars lead by the united states then you are going to need something like this space station partnership and the confidence building that has already taken place to also participate in that mission and so there is a policy issue that you may wish to consider and that is that as people renegotiate the international space station partnership, you could add to it some goals that are related to the development of the technology from beyond lao exploration to the space station partnership so that they began to develop an awareness of the really great challenges and technical challenges that will face all of us as we tried to get to mars and we begin to enlist them in the effort. and that could -- i don't know whether that would serve as a precursor for the partnership we have built but it certainly would build -- be a confidence builder and i think it would help start the process off in a way that is useful to the united states. >> one other comment i would add to that is, we are all aware that the space station was nearly cancel
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
the coal industry in the united states losing as thousands of tens of thousands of jobs instead of pursuing the cleanest technology in the area of coal. my record -- chairman of the house administration. we got rid of the program. the former speaker gave us the savings of equivalence of carbon emissions of one car per year. we have the results in on the program i established which is waste energy. it produces enough energy to light 250 homes 3-year. it reduces that which would go to landfill by 5,000 tons and the number of car equivalence it takes off the street in terms of carbon emissions is almost 900. that is a pretty good record. bera: you are suggesting global warming change we are seeing may not be caused by man-made sources? lungren: my point is we don't know to what extent it is and what moves we would take on our own in the united states will have an effect. at the same time it makes good common sense to attempt to try to reduce carbon emissions where possible. >> moderator: you want to talk about climate change? bera: the climate is changing. we are seeing extremes happen. talk t
$16,000 every second george allen was the united states senator. voted to raise the debt ceiling four times, voted to raise his own salary four times. now he's talking like a conservative, but his record shows he can't have another crack at it because his actions don't match his word. again, i think the right strategy is an aggregated examination of deductions rather than fighting issue-to-issue. you can have the amount or percentage vary by income or how the tax code is already. that's the most likely path to lead to success. >> we're out of time on that answer. >> can i have time to rebut? >> not according to your rules. i like more than less, but going on. >> governor allen, virginia voters are divided on whether they want the affordable care act to stay or go because it's not completely ruled out and because it's so complex. do you want to completely get rid of the law as a stands and start over on health care reform from strach or favor -- scratch or favor another method? >> i'll use the first part to rebut comments tim made. tim talked about $16,000 of debt. now it's the spendin
the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we say the national anthem. which was quickly disproved just by looking at youtube, people around the world going like this when they sang the national anthem. he dropped that the very next day. i don't think he ever said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that's an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely in small increments. >> and i think the other thing, we're talking before the panel with brendan about this, i think the other thing we don't know was how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making as, with speechwriters come as they are talking about wording? and how often are they sang well, if we say that the fact checkers will get us. now, i suspect that's happening a lot. but the only evidence i have had of it as a column written by connie schultz who is married to jerry brown, who said that conversation happened in the brown campaign. i suspect it is happening in many campaigns, and i think that th
-thirds of the united states. and the corn crop is going to be really reduced because of it. and if you planted 80 million to 85 million acres of corn and we had the same drought, you'd still have the high price of grain that we have right now but you wouldn't have ethanol to blame for it. so the marketplace is bringing about the increased production of corn because of feed, fuel and fiber, and -- and you should not be scapegoating ethanol because if we didn't have ethanol to blame, we wouldn't be planting 95, 96 million acres of corn, we'd be planting about 80 million to 85 million acres of corn and we'd still have the same problem, the same high price, the same problem for the poultry producers. now to the point that i came to the senate. we all recognize that our nation faces challenging times. we've had years with unemployment at unacceptable levels and anemic economic growth that shows no sign of lifting us out of the situation. meanwhile, rampant government spending, which we were promised would jump-start the economy and create jobs, has instead displaced private-sector investment and choke
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8